Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Does the CIDO deal mean tanker values are on the upside?


Jonathan Chappell argues that Craig Stevenson's massive US$ 1 bn product tanker acquisition deal to purchase the 30-vessel CIDO fleet is good news for tanker asset values. He estimates a US$ 40 mio price tag per vessel up from his previous US$ 36-37 mio valuation for a three year old tanker. He believes that supply and demand will improve in this sector this year and in 2012 seeing this a 'smart money' deal. I am more skeptical.

We saw last year Peter Georgiopoulos's block tanker acquisition deal with Metrostar at premium prices and how bad timing resulted in drastic fall in the Genmar share price and a dramatic capital injection/ loan restructuring with Oaktree.

The Cido fleet had been up for sale for some time. CIDO has been steadily shedding off assets for months. There were numerous rumored suitors for this deal including Navios. Stevenson's company Diamond S. Shipping was the highest bidder and fixed the vessels at a premium price. Whether this is really a good deal depends on future events.

Until now, Diamond S had no ships in the water. Diamond S currently has eight 158,000-dwt tankers and two 105,000-dwt product carriers on order from yards in South Korea for delivery between next year and in 2012. His ex-OMI senior management - Robert Bugbee and Cameron Mackey - moved to Scorpio. The Cido acquisitions is a transformatory development making it a functional ship owning company that operates 30 tankers.

Scorpio by contrast is not a company that would bet on such a big move. Emmanuele Lauro first built up a cargo operation and then started scaling up incrementally. Craig Stevenson is buying assets before building his commercial or technical management capability.

Presently things in the product tanker market are bad. The transatlantic market is flat and east of Suez is slow. Big ships are in dire straights. Earning margins are poor. Operating expenses are high. Bunkers are capping any returns potential. There is very limited free cash flow to pay debt and dividends.

The product tanker story revolves on new refinery capacity coming on stream in Asia and the Middle East to catalyze CPP exports and boost ton-mile for product tankers. But the timing of this development is dependent on when a major pick-up in demand is seen for gasoline/diesel in the West, combined with the movement in CPP inventories in the latter region. For 2011, distance-adjusted demand is expected to advance 6% and the product tanker fleet is expected to grow by 5%. Rates may not improve meaningfully until 2012 and even 2013.

Whilst there is a positive general consensus on the product tanker market as a good long-term investment, such a notion could change dramatically if the fundamental outlook changes (through macroeconomic disappointments, structural changes in the industry etc).

No comments:

Post a Comment